Netro Smart Watering -Water Infrequently, Longer for Better Lawn

Yiting Pan
Updated at 2018-09-12 07:54:55 UTC 


Frequent, shallow watering encourages a shallow root system. A shallow root system means a lawn is under drought stress when the top inch of soil dries out.

Conversely, deep, infrequent watering during hot, dry weather is important to maintain a healthy lawn. Deep watering encourages the turf to develop a deeper, more extensive root system. The denser root system will make your grass less susceptible to periods of drought. A more dynamic root system will also offer the fringe benefit of discouraging competition from weeds.

To determine how long you have to run your sprinkler or irrigation system, take a flat-bottomed container such as a coffee can and mark off half-inch increments. Place the can or cans where it will be hit by the water, and time how long it takes to gather a half-inch of water. Then run your sprinkler twice as long. You may need to apply water even slower to steep slopes to avoid wasting water to runoff.

Netro's motto when it comes to watering: slowly, deeply, infrequently. Netro's algorithm is based on expert gardening knowledge, one of which is to avoid watering equally everyday and instead to water less frequently but deeply. Netro waters your garden only when the soil is dry enough in order to draw more oxygen into the roots, leading to a lusher landscape. By default, we allow the moisture level to deplete to a lower level before next watering and that is why you might see longer watering duration than the original settings on your old controller.

Netro smart controller gives your lawn the right amount of water, assures that your garden is getting its required amount of water – no more, and no less.



Resources:

Water infrequently, longer for better lawn

http://www.post-gazette.com/life/garden/2009/09/19/Water-infrequently-longer-for-better-lawn/stories/200909190132

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What percentage is ideal for the moisture content for a summer lawn in Southern CA?

Gary Riehl
Updated at 2018-08-17 18:05:53 UTC 

Can you please tell me the ideal percentage for the top soil and sub soil for a Southern CA. lawn in summer?  Does this number change during the other seasons?

Thank you. 

Gary

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Soil type?

John Broadbent
Updated at 2018-06-16 14:27:36 UTC 
The app has a number of soil choices- I don’t know which to choose. I assume different soil has different water retention. Is there a list which shows how much water the different soil types require?  Or is there a way to tell which soil you have?
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Tips for Watering New Garden Plants

Yiting Pan
Updated at 2018-06-04 12:37:29 UTC 

How you water your new plants can make all the difference. Deeper, less frequent watering will grow plants whose roots are deeper and healthier, so they are more resilient to drier conditions and stress. Water a plant immediately when you plant it. If watered properly the first growing season, your plants should be well established the following growing season. Their roots should be deep and tough enough to seek out water on their own. You will only have to water these established plants on hot, dry days or if they are showing signs of distress.

The following are general guidelines. How often and how long you water will depend on your soil and other factors.

1.Year One

When planting water plants as soon as you get them in the ground. Allow the water to soak in and drain, and water again, until the soil is thoroughly moistened.

2.For the first week or so after planting

Water just-planted plants frequently - daily or every other day - as the roots will not be able to access soil moisture from a very large area until they begin to grow.

3.After the first week or so

Unless the weather is extremely hot and dry, you may be able to decrease watering frequency, perhaps to two or three times per week, for the next month or so.

4.Years Two to Three

You should need to water deeply only once or twice per week in dry weather if you have selected the right plant for the right place, prepared the soil and planted correctly, and mulched your plants. Exactly how often and how long you water will depend on your soil and other conditions.

5.After Year Three

Properly planted and watered, plants should be fairly well established by now, and can thrive with less watering than you may expect.


Helpful Tips

• Know your soil type, as this greatly affects watering frequency and duration.

• Allow the top inch or two of soil to dry between waterings to encourage deep roots.

• Group plants with similar water needs together.

• Consider using soaker hoses, as you can get water where you need it and lose less to evaporation.

• Young trees will need deep regular watering during their growing periods. During periods of little or no rain, water deeply once a week until they become established. Water established trees during heat waves and drought conditions.

• Spot-water plants with different needs than the rest of the planting bed.

• Remember that shallow-rooted plants such as rhododendrons, azaleas, heathers and bedding plants may continue to need more frequent watering than most other plants.

• Mulch for moisture. Mulch reduces water loss and adds humus to your soil to retain more moisture.

• Check for soil moisture before

Before you water:

Generally, you want the soil to be dry an inch or two below the surface before you water, so probe with a spade or trowel to check.

At least one hour after you water (or longer with clay soil):

Probe into the soil again to see how deeply the water penetrated. Did it penetrate all the way to the root zone? If not, you may need to increase your watering time. But if the area looks well-saturated, you may want to cut back the next time.

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How to Water Trees and Shrubs

Yiting Pan
Updated at 2018-06-04 10:07:08 UTC 


The amount and frequency of watering depends on the root system of your plants. Shrubs and trees -known as woody plants - have the potential to grow deeper root systems than flowers which means they draw water from a larger volume of soil. In general, if you receive a good rain every week or 10 days, these woody plants are probably getting the water they need. They thrive with a deep watering with less frequency than most flowers. When plants are shallow-rooted they will need more frequent light irrigation just like the lawn.


1.How to Water Shrubs

The most efficient way to water woody shrubs is to apply water slowly to the soil allowing it to penetrate deeply to rewet the entire root system without running off. This can be done by repeatedly moving a slow flowing hose from bed to bed or by using a drip irrigation system that allows water to leak gradually along the entire length of the irrigation tubing. It is important that the water reaches the plants roots. It is unnecessary and wasteful to water deeper than the plant's root zone.

If you are using an irrigation system, it is worth noting that woody shrubs need to be watered separately from shallow rooted plants and thus need to be on a different irrigation valve than lawns or flowers.


2.How to Water Trees

Trees need regular water during the first several years after planting, until the roots have grown deep enough to carry the plant through dry periods. Once established, however, most trees require only infrequent irrigation.

Stop watering when runoff starts. Soils high in clay accept water slowly, often as little as 1/4 inch per hour. Water infiltration is especially slow in compacted soils. If water starts to pool or run off, stop irrigating, let the water soak in, and start watering again.

Don't saturate the soil for long periods. Water displaces air in the soil, so long periods of soil saturation can suffocate growing roots. Take a long enough break between irrigation cycles to allow the free water to be absorbed. If in doubt, probe or dig to make sure that the soil isn't soggy below the surface.


3. How to Determine the Right Amount of Water

Don't wait for the plants to tell you with wilting and leaves dropping off. Then youll just be watering to keep the plants roots alive so it may possible come back later. Inspect the soil. Dig around with your hands, soil probe, garden trowel, or shovel. Youll be able to tell quickly how far down you are actually watering.

With a little practice, you will be able to maintain the proper moisture balance to ensure your shrubs get the water they need to thrive in your landscape.


Resources

https://www.loveyourlandscape.org/expert-advice/shrubs-and-flowers/basic-care/how-much-water-do-shrubs-need/

https://tomlinsonbomberger.com/blog/how-to-water-new-trees-shrubs-and-other-plants/


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